For years, Thanksgiving for many Moab residents has included a delicious community-wide meal, where one could sit with old friends and make several new ones at the same time. The annual Thanksgiving meal has been held by Moab nonprofit WabiSabi for the last 15 years, bringing hundreds of Moab residents from all walks of life together for a multi-course feast with traditional Thanksgiving foods. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, large gatherings are on pause, but the holiday meal tradition will continue – this year, meals must be ordered ahead of time and will be delivered by volunteers.

WabiSabi has partnered with Sweet Cravings Bakery and Bistro and The Synergy Company (a Moab-based nutritional supplement business) to bring the community the 16th Annual Thanksgiving Meal: COVID Edition.

Between now and Sunday, Nov. 22, Moab residents may order a Thanksgiving meal — with vegetarian or gluten-sensitive options – so long as supplies last. Meals are on a first-come, first-serve basis. The traditional meal consists of a slice of whole turkey breast with gravy, mashed potatoes, stuffing, a vegetable side, a homemade roll with strawberry jam, cranberry sauce and a surprise dessert. The vegetarian/gluten-sensitive option will include a veggie frittata, salad and a macaroon.

WabiSabi Program Director Megan Millar said that The Synergy Company has provided the funding for Sweet Cravings to prepare the meals, while WabiSabi is coordinating the event, including the volunteers that will do the deliveries.

Meals will be delivered on Thanksgiving morning, Thursday, Nov. 26, between 9 a.m. and noon. Due to the volume of deliveries, Millar said, meals will be delivered cold and need to be heated in an oven or microwave.

She encouraged anyone hesitating to order out of concern it may take away from someone who needs it more not to worry, and to go ahead and place an order. Millar said WabiSabi worked with local organizations to connect the meals with persons most at-need before opening the meals up to the rest of the community. Complimentary meals have also been ordered for hospital staff.

She also pointed out that, as the community copes with the COVID-19 pandemic, “need” takes on a new meaning: Some who may be able to financially afford a Thanksgiving meal may be limited in the ability to prepare it in the absence of a group gathering.

Millar also said WabiSabi had received “a huge outpouring of support” from volunteers, many of whom are working in pairs to deliver the meals. While there are enough volunteers to do the deliveries, WabiSabi is still seeking financial contributions to support the program. Any additional funds raised by the Thanksgiving community meals will go to support WabiSabi’s nonprofit partners – other area-nonprofits that WabiSabi supports with mentorship as well as materials and funds derived from its donation-based thrift store (160 E. 100 South, Moab).

Millar said that supporting the WabiSabi Thanksgiving meal fits with the Thanksgiving spirit.

“It’s a way to give back on this holiday that is all about giving back,” she said.

Millar expressed thankfulness to Sweet Cravings and The Synergy Company.

“Without their support, this would not be able to happen,” she said.

To make a donation, go to www.wabisabimoab.org/thanksgiving or mail a check to 160 E. 100 South, Moab, 84532, with “Thanksgiving” written in the memo line.

To order a meal, call 435-259-2553 and provide an address for delivery and a phone number. Orders may also be made online at www.wabisabimoab.org/thanksgiving.