Desert Power Yoga

Pictured, from left to right, are Desert Power Yoga instructors Janae Hollenback, Breann Davis, Crystal Bunch, Courtney Reese, Gregory Lee Hood, Jill Kuzman, Aron Cohen and Lena Powell. [Photo: Brittany Cantwell / Courtesy Courtney Reese]

Maybe you made a New Years resolution to focus on your health. Perhaps you need to de-stress and reground after reading recent national news. Or, maybe you just like taking yoga classes taught by certified instructors with experience in a wide variety of yogic traditions. Whether new to yoga or a long-time practitioner, Desert Power Yoga (420 N. 500 West, Moab) welcomes you.

“We have a little something for everyone,” said Courtney Reese, the founder of Desert Power Yoga, who also serves as an instructor. “We are fortunate to have teachers from a bunch of different backgrounds.”

There are classes held every day of the week and roughly a dozen instructors teach at Desert Power Yoga in addition to Reese. The drop-in rate per class is $14 for a local resident and $20 for visitors, or you can opt for a class package or membership deals. The weekly Hatha + Yin class taught by instructor Rupa Adama on Saturday mornings at 9 a.m. is offered by-donation to make it accessible to the whole community.

The winter schedule for Desert Power Yoga includes several classes that Reese characterized as “more relaxed,” such as Vinyasa, Restorative Yoga, Athlete’s Recovery Yoga and Gentle Yoga. These classes are more focused on stretching and flexibility, in contrast to other classes like Yoga Fusion, a class taught by Reese that incorporates techniques of ballet, yoga and pilates and provides a cardio/strength-training workout. The eponymous Power Yoga class is another high-intensity, strength-building class.

“The cool thing about Power Yoga classes is that they are all different,” Reese said, adding that all involve “using your muscles.”

Some of the classes are “hot,” meaning that the studio temperature is kept between 80 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit and between 30% to 40% humidity.

“When you practice yoga in a heated space, it enables your muscles to fully expand and relax so you’re able to get into the stretches a bit more deeply,” Reese said.

There is a mental component as well, Reese added. Yoga is a meditative practice, but it can be all too easy for a practitioner’s mind to wander.

“The heat and humidity forces you to focus more on the yoga pose rather than anything else,” Reese said.

Little Warriors Kids Yoga, an hour-long class that meets at 5:15 p.m. on Fridays, is for young people four to nine years of age and teaches “the importance of movement and stillness” according to the class description. Each week has a theme, and participants are encouraged to dress up in accordance with that theme, or in a special costume or an outfit they prefer.

“Our goal in all of the classes is to make it accessible to everyone,” Reese said.

Reese opened Desert Power Yoga in its current location in May of last year. She has been doing yoga since 2012 and teaching since 2016. When she isn’t teaching yoga, she is an x-ray technician at Moab Regional Hospital.

As class space is limited, participants are asked to register on the studio website and arrive 10 to 15 minutes ahead of the class start time.

Masks are required for class check-ins but may be removed once stationed on a mat for class. Class registration is limited to allow for proper physical distancing. Participants are encouraged to bring their own yoga props, such as a yoga mat, though these are available for rent from the studio as well. Instructors are currently refraining from offering hands-on adjustments as a pandemic safety measure.

For more information, including a full list of classes with descriptions and instructor bios, or to register for a class, go to www.desertpoweryoga.com. Desert Power Yoga may be reached by calling 303-905-0062 or emailing desertpoweryoga@gmail.com.