Golf

The Global Scramble Challenge will take place on July 13 and 14 at the Moab Golf Club. [Photo by Murice D. Miller / Moab Sun News]

This weekend the Moab Golf Club hosts the annual Global Scramble Challenge, a low-key tournament where the focus is on teamwork and fun rather than individual winners. 

The event on Saturday and Sunday, July 13 and 14, features both men’s and women’s categories and is conducted in a three-person scramble format. In this style of play, all three golfers drive from the tee. They choose the best shot of the three and play from that spot. The process is repeated all the way to the green until one of the players putts the ball into the hole. 

In a traditional tournament, a few bad shots can knock an individual player out of contention. The scramble format keeps things fun by allowing each player on the team to contribute good shots while discarding poor ones. 

“You can have someone who is great off the tee, and another golfer who’s a good chipper or putter,” said local golfer and club employee Glenda Ciarus. She has enjoyed playing in the tournament many times in the past. “You’re not out there on your own.” 

“It’s more relaxed” than some other tournaments, said Rob Jones, the club’s manager and golf pro. 

“I’m expecting around 60 players, maybe more,” Jones said. “Mostly from the Moab area and around Utah, but we always have a few come in from Colorado as well.”

Jones said there is still space available for anyone who wants to play. The entry fee is $70 per person and there will be cash prizes for the top men’s and women’s teams. 

There will be a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. on the mornings of July 13 and 14. During a shotgun start, teams begin playing at different holes at the same time. The atmosphere will be lively, with plenty of golfers on the course. 

The public is welcome to come out and watch the tournament. The 18-hole course is located at 2705 S. East Bench Rd., at the south end of town. 

As the dog days of summer dry the Moab area, the golf course provides an oasis of cottonwood trees with shade for spectators. The fairways are lush and the greens are in good shape, especially compared to the conditions during last year’s drought. A wet winter and high run-off levels in Ken’s Lake for irrigation have meant plenty of water keeping the course green.

“The course is looking great this summer,” Jones said.

Weather for the tournament is expected to be clear and sunny with temperatures in the upper 90s.

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