Imagine running 3,100 miles over 52 straight days, but only covering the distance of a single city block.

That’s what happens during the yearly Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race, the longest certified foot race in the world.

Runners from around the world gather each year in New York to run a half-block radius until they’ve accumulated 3,100 miles – all for the sake of peace.

Moab will host two-time 3100 Mile Race finisher Harita Davies for a free film screening as part of Peace Run activities taking place from Sept. 15-17.

The film, “3100: Run and Become,” will be shown at Star Hall, Monday, Sept. 16, at 6 p.m.

“It’s about the connection between running and spirituality,” Davies said. She will be in attendance at the movie screening to answer questions.

The documentary examines the significance of running in many cultures, featuring runners from the Navajo Nation, Japan, and across the globe.

The 3100 Mile Race was begun by late spiritual leader Sri Shinmoy, who believed a person could reach transcendence through sports, particularly running, said Moab resident Jessica Kisiel.

Kisiel participated in a San Diego Peace Run event and was inspired to bring Peace Run events to the area because of the organization’s positive, uplifting message.

“The main message is ‘peace begins with me,’” Kisiel said.

Peace Run is an international organization that schedules long runs and a biannual global torch relay that it says “embodies humanity's universal aspiration for peace.” Davies is also director of the U.S. Peace Run.

As part of the Peace Run visit to Moab, team members will give a brief presentation at Arches National Park Visitor Center on Sunday, Sept. 15, at 9:30 a.m. with a run to Delicate Arch to follow at 11 a.m.

On Tuesday, Sept. 17, team members will lead a free meditation at the Moab Recreation and Aquatics Center, 374 Park Ave., at 5:30 p.m. Although not required, reservations are appreciated.

“We’re sharing a simple message that peace starts with each one of us,” Davies said. “We can contribute, starting with ourselves, and not be too discouraged about the state of the world.”

“It’s a powerful, beautiful expression and cry for peace,” she said.